Re:Generation 2031

Developing our next generation of cultural and creative leaders

The cultural and creative future of the Thames Estuary should be shaped by the ambitions of its young people.

We want to empower more young people to access creative careers and develop the skills they need to lead new commissions, produce events, create the jobs of the future and make the Estuary a creative production hub.

We intend to champion the next generation of creative talent and future cultural leaders in the region by giving them new access to training, mentoring and aspirational opportunities. RE:Generation 2031 is an innovative approach to developing the creative skills of young people aged 16 to 25 years in disadvantaged areas of North Kent and South Essex.

“Talent is everywhere, but opportunity is not.”
Caroline Norbury MBE. CEO Creative England

Supporting the South East Local Enterprise Partnership (SELEP) skills strategy, the project will pro-actively recruit learners in our most disengaged and disadvantaged areas, developing their creative skills, increasing confidence, and breaking down barriers to employment.

Young people will receive a route into the creative industries through mentoring programmes, funding support, new training courses and exciting networking opportunities. They will also co-design and test new approaches to creative skills development with the project leaders.

At the same time, the project will address challenges faced by small businesses and freelancers in terms of capacity and financial barriers in delivering skills and training, and develop solutions using connections and partnerships across industries.

The project model is being developed in partnership with partners in higher education, further education, schools, creative freelancers and businesses, SMEs, skills agencies and young people themselves.

A dedicated Creative Skills Development Manager will initiate, establish and sustain a diverse range of partnerships to support the development of relevant creative skills opportunities.

 

Image credit: © Gulbenkian